Administrator Elected President of Kentucky Association of Blacks in Higher Education

Kim Merritt photo

Kimberly Merritt, assistant director of admissions for student recruitment at Eastern Kentucky University, was recently elected president of the Kentucky Association of Blacks in Higher Education (KABHE).

Originally called the UK Colloquium, KABHE was founded in 1983 by the late Dr. William Parker, former Vice Chancellor of Minority Affairs at the University of Kentucky, and other minority leaders in the Commonwealth. From its inception, the organization’s pivotal goals were to improve the professional status and the living and learning conditions of African Americans employed at institutions of higher education throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Merritt, a member of KABHE since 2003, has previously served as southeast regional representative and vice president of the organization. In her new role as president, Merritt will work toward developing a structured mentoring program, which is important to continue KABHE’s mission of enhancing the personal and professional growth of those to come.

“I believe every organization needs to have a clear and solid foundation,” Merritt said, indicating her passion and commitment to the organization’s goals. “I believe those who came before me would like to see the continued development of innovative solutions to educational issues that are affecting African Americans. Being elected president of the Kentucky Association of Blacks in Higher Education will allow me to continue the legacy of dedication, strong motivational forces and the advancement of African Americans in Kentucky.”

As the assistant director of admissions for student recruitment at EKU, Merritt is responsible for overseeing recruiters covering more than 85 counties in Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana and other states.

KABHE is open to any person interested in promoting the purpose of the organization. It is comprised of nearly 200 diverse faculty and staff representing all of the eight comprehensive institutions, KCTCS, state educational agencies, and private colleges. Annual conferences are held throughout the state as well as special days in Frankfort, where members and students take part in legislative sessions to better understand the political processes and connections within higher education. 

Published on October 01, 2013